Thursday, June 1, 2017

How to Sprout Lentils



Dried brown lentils can be a nutritious low cost part of your menu, but when they are sprouted by soaking in water and allowing them to germinate they become a live food. Their enzymes, vitamin content, and digestibility are increased when they are soaked and sprouted. In addition, they become softer, crunchier, and nuttier tasting.

Once sprouted, you can eat them without cooking like a vegetable and enjoy them added to salads, as filler in sandwiches or wraps, or to use in recipes to make vegetarian burgers. What a great way to get a nutritional boost for practically no extra calories! There is a big difference in starch and calories between cooked regular lentils and the lentil sprouts!

In fact, any nut, seed, grain or lentil can be sprouted ( If it is still in it's natural state).

I used regular dry brown lentils for my lentil sprouts


Making lentil sprouts is an easy 3 step process

Soak, Strain off Water, Repeat for 2-3 days

1. Soak your lentils ( picked over and cleaned lentils)  over night in a mason jar ( wide or regular mouth jar) and cover with a lid without the flat seal ( your lid will be open) . Replace the flat seal with cheesecloth so you will be able to strain your lentils.

2. In the morning strain off the water  but leave the lentils in the jar. Rinse a few times and then drain well.

3. Leave on the counter in a flat position to allow the lentils to spread out.

4. Repeat the process 2-3 times a day ( rinse and drain well) for 2 days

5. You will see sprouts appear.

6. Refrigerate when sprouts are the length you like


*** Please note that it is important to wash and drain a few times a day to remove any bacteria and always refrigerate when lentils are sprouted to the length you like. Eat within 3 days.



Sprouts are one of the healthiest, simplest, and easiest foods to grow right on your kitchen counter.
You could invest in a commercial sprouting jar, but it isn't necessary.
I use a large mason jar and for sprouting and it works just fine.

You will need to strain the seeds after washing so you could use cheesecloth or purchase stainless steel ( BPA free) straining lids from Amazon . I get mine at  Sprouting Lid for Mason Jars Canning Jar Strainer Lid Set For Sprouts, Sifting, and Straining - Regular Mouth - Set of 4 - FREE SHIPPING

These are mung bean sprouts - you can buy mung beans buy in bags in health food stores 

You have probably seen or eaten bean sprouts in recipes in Chinese restaurants. They are white long translucent shoots that have been sprouted for about a week and are made from mung beans.


I like to eat my sprouts after I've let them sprout for 2- 3 days.
That's when I think they have the most flavor and the greatest nutrient value.

When a seed, bean, nut, or grain is soaked , the germination process is activated. Once a little seed or bean begins to activate, it's vitamin content and it's enzymes are increased.
Enzymes are super important for our health and anti-aging.





You may see packages of sprouts in the produce section of many supermarkets- they have mixtures of bean sprouts, broccoli seed sprouts( which are extremely healthy) and alfalfa seed sprouts on the shelves. But sprouts are so easy to make and so much fresher when you make your own.

How do I eat my sprouts? 
I throw them on salads, mix them with cooked vegetables, add them to my mason jar lunches, sprinkle them on top of a bowl of soup,  and make burgers out of them.

Many food experts suggest that a significant percentage of our diet should come from raw foods. 
Why ? Because only raw uncooked foods contains an abundance of precious enzymes that our bodies need for digesting food, anti- aging, and good health. Sprouts are a good source of enzymes.




10 comments:

  1. You make sprouting lentils sound so easy and it is! Just love what you said, so I'm going to requote it here..."Many food experts suggest that a significant percentage of our diet should come from raw foods. Why ? Because only raw uncooked foods contains an abundance of precious enzymes that our bodies need for digesting food, anti- aging, and good health. Sprouts provide you with lots of enzymes." Thanks Judee for providing this worthwhile post at the Plant-based Potluck. Nancy Andres @ http://obloggernewbie.blogspot.com/2017/05/marvelous-marinated-veggies-and-tofu.html

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    1. Nancy,
      Thank you for stopping by and commenting on my lentils. I think it is one of the healthiest ways to get fresh enzymes.

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  2. Thank you for this post! I was happy to see it at the Plant-based potluck as a reminder to start sprouting again.

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    1. I know . I used to sprout and then stopped for a long time. I've just started again. It's funny because it is so super easy and so healthy. thanks for stopping by and thanks for your comment

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  3. I am such a sprout lover -- they are so crunchy and healthy -- so I am delighted that you shared How to Sprout Lentils with us at the Plant-based Potluck Party. I'm pinning and sharing this.

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    1. I love sprouts too but I get into times when I always make them and then I can forget about them for a year. I'm glad I'm making them now

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  4. I never thought about how lentils were sprouted. So easy to do and so nutritious! thanks for the tutorial!

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    1. I never realized how inexpensive they are to make and how many recipes they can be used in. I'm publishing 4 recipes

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  5. Your post is awesome and thanks so much for sharing it with us at Full Plate Thursday. Hope you are having a great day and come back to see us real soon!
    Miz Helen

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    1. Miz Helen,
      I appreciate your thoughtful comment about how to sprout. We enjoy them and the health benefits of eating fresh live food.

      Delete

Thank you for your comment - I love the feedback and interaction

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